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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
just lost re-election and the eight or so seats. on the other hand, he still has a very diverse caucus in terms of ideology and it's going to be very difficult. you'll notice in hiss comments he didn't say no to 37%. that said, if he agreed to 37% and he's basically bilateral talks with the president, who says the kwaux is going to approve that. he could end up with a lot of egg on his face if he agrees with the president on this, they go forward with the vote, and it doesn't pass. >> david, the office of management and budget, omb, asking government agencies to figure out what they would cut if we do go over this fiscal cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over t
economy and those seeking work. i came out the day after the election to put revenues on the table, to take a step toward the president to try to resolve this. when is he going to take a step towards us? >> can you see some way that you could agree to tax rate increase and protect small businesses at the same time, maybe going with the 37%, or some middle ground? >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue that the president seeks on the table, but none of it is going to be possible. if the president insists on his position, insists on my way or the highway. that is not the way to get to an agreement that i think is important for the american people and very important for our economy. thanks. >> reporter: for more on the fiscal cliff let's bring in bob sue sack, managing editor of the hill. thanks for joining us. >> thanks for having me on. >> reporter: he says this is a slow walk for our economy to the edge of the fiscal cliff, and if the president doesn't like the republican's plan he has an obligation to send them one that can pass both houses of congress a
working inside the elected -- the elected claim ber of the united states stat or better off resigning and becoming head of the -- head of heritage? it was a no-brainer. you know -- >> remarkable. >> financial incentiveta. but it's remarkable and shows you limits in which being a united states senator -- i've talked to other senators who made the decision to try to get into leadership track who said it's no fun trying to be party of one or gang of six or gang of eight. it stinks especially ex-governors can't stand it in there. it is sad that you don't feel as if you can make a -- as big of a difference inside the senate as you can at a special interest group. welcome to politics of the 21st century. >> i couldn't agree more, chuck. frankly i think jim demint couldn't agree more. he said, i'm leaving the senate now but i'm not leaving the fight. i've decided to join the heritage foundation at a time when the conservative movement needs strong leadership in the battle of ideas. chuck, to your point. kelly, i want to go to you. in the midst, and we'll talk about the fiscal cliff in a minu
and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail or in the streets in opposition for their entire careers. they come into office. why would we think that they spent all their time out of office reading the federalists papers in arabic translations? they didn't. the only political game they know how to play is the old play. >> get power. >> seize it. in this case, the
type of constitution in which the people can have a say in electing their government. and where the countries then are put on a more stable footing. because once that goes, then what? so this is fantastically difficult. once you lift the lid off these very repressive regimes and out comes all this religious and tribal tension, we have to find a way to stabilizing the situation and bring the bloodshed to an end. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding t
? he was just re-elected. why couldn't he put together a package, a deal to avoid this disaster? >> i think this is a question of political leadership. and as that poll showed, there's no doubt that the president has the political advantage going into this. but at some point, and i think we're kind of getting close to it, the president has to be able to pivot and to say how do i turn this political advantage into a real policy accomplishment? and, wolf, i don't think you're going to do that with continued campaign style events like we just saw meeting with middle class families. okay. we get that. that occurred during the campaign. the white house has clearly gotten its message out. i think now there has to be a next step. you know, timing is everything in politics. and this is absolutely no different. what i'm getting from talking to some democrats on the hill is i think there's actually a lot of pent up anger and frustration among democrats how they feel republicans were obstructionist for the last four years. there's a little bit of payback going on here. they've got the advantage.
on an agreement or on direct elections for a new assembly. >> and in his speech, he refused to rescind his recent decree, giving himself virtually absolute power. it is expected tomorrow, shepard, that there are going to be more mass demonstrations on the streets of cairo. back to you. >> shepard: david lee miller live from jerusalem. it's been quite a day tore the millionaire software inventor john mcafee. he was supposed to be headed back to belize now to face questions in one of his neighbor's death. but john mcafee hasn't gone to belouise. instead he headed to the hospital. a bizarre new development in an already very strange case. plus, why the man accused of pushing somebody in front of a new york city subway says it was really the victim's fault. that's ahead from the journalists of fox news on this thursday fox report. a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet the five-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max says ha. c-max says wheeee. which is what you get, don't you see? cause c-max has lots more horsepower than prius v, a hybrid that c-max
, where election timing may spell budget delays. we have the story from tokyo. >> the election campaign has officially kicked off in japan, but there are worries the budget is not likely to be ready pi the end of this year. they will likely call a special session to elect a new prime minister, then select a cabinet before moving on to budget matters. once they reconvene in january, the new government would likely pass the supplementary budget first before submitting its fiscal 2013 plan in february. so a senior lawmaker predicts that the fiscal 2013 budget will not actually pass until mid may. that's more than a month into the new fiscal year. and if the government can't get the job done by the end of march, a provisional budget will be needed. opinion polls show the gap between the ldp and the ruling democratic party has been narrowing. that means if the ldp can't get their majority, these bills could be delayed even more. back to you, ross. >> all right, thanks for that. that's the late fres the nikkei. still to come, the business of entertainment in asia, it's big. going to get even
an election. the conservatives are likely to take power. and support nuclear power once again. that's likely to cause gridlock in the parliament, send demonstrators in the streets. back to you, charlie and norah. >> lucy craft, thank you. >>> back here in washington there is little movement toward a compromise to avoid the fiscal cliff. there are just 25 days until the deadline. officials are saying the negotiations are now in the had hands of two men, president obama and house speaker eer jo boehner. bill plante is at the white house. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. and good morning in the west. the president has stepped up his rhetoric, warning failure to fix the fiscal crisis could sour the christmas season. as another day passed without any real progress, president obama ventured out to push his claim that the middle class will suffer. ♪ you better watch out you better not cry ♪ >> at the national christmas tree lighting, president obama joined the holiday mood. but earlier, visiting a middle class virginia family, he threatened that congress could ruin the christmas season
a dozen tea party-like conservatives elected. >> let me jump in, dana. i want to run through them because, you know, when we think senator demint we think of a tea party stronghold within the u.s. senate and helped and also hurt a number of republican candidates. who were they? >> reporter: that's right. great. let's start with the senators now. obviously, who he helped elect. this is the positive side of his millions and his work. marco rubio, pat toomey. very conservative, anti-tax, anti-government purists in the mold of jim demint. however, he also backed in republican primaries a number of republican candidates who simply were not electable according to the republican establishment and the establishment was right. for example, remember christine o'donnell, i'm not a witch, from delaware. ken buck of colorado. and others. so those are some of the reasons why he definitely has ruffled many a-feather with the party leaders and i have to tell you first thing i saw when the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell released a statement today was making the point that demint had, quote, unco
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)